Creationists cock-a-hoop over Canadian dino discovery; say it kicks a hole in evolutionary theory

LAST June a group of scientists unearthed a fascinating dinosaur fossil in western Alberta. Much to the researchers’ astonishment, a piece of well-preserved dinosaur skin was attached to the hadrosaur fossil.

dinosaur_skin_wide

One of the scientists on the team, University of Regina physicist Mauricio Barbi, was thrilled about the discovery, commenting that the specimen could be a key to learning more about what dinosaurs looked like.

Meanwhile, reports CNN, while some scientists are elated by this discovery’s implications, others are asking a very basic question:

How could this dinosaur skin – which, according to evolutionary models, is at least 60 million years old – have possibly remained intact without decaying away?

Many biblical creationists say the answer is simple:

It couldn’t have.

Brian Thomas, head “science” writer for the Institute for Creation Research (ICR), recently published an article for ICR, in which he details why it is absurd to believe that dinosaur skin like this could have possibly survived for tens of millions of years. Incidentally, he is the author of Dinosaurs and the Bible and has stated:

My vision is to equip believers to be confident in Christ and in the veracity of His entire Word by showing how strongly science and history support Him.

Brian Thomas

Brian Thomas

In his dinosaur article, the crackpot asks:

Who, upon entering a room and encountering a burning candle would immediately begin to wonder what special something about that candle enabled it to continually burn for a million years? Would it not make more sense to first question how long such a candle could potentially burn before going out?

Eh?

In an interview with CNN, Thomas explained that skin is primarily comprised of collagen, which is a tough, insoluble protein. Despite its resilience, rigorous tests have shown that collagen (like other proteins) decays steadily over time, and– even in ideal, “best case” scenarios – could never last more than one million years. In fact, under realistic conditions, collagen’s maximum “shelf life” is probably closer to 300,000 years.

Given the constant decay rate of proteins, Thomas compared the collagen in dinosaur skin to an egg timer.

When the timer ‘dings,’ there should be no skin left. Even if it’s encased in rock, it turns into dust right in the middle of the rock, because of the nature of the chemistry. So … the timer should have ‘dinged’ long before the millions of years that evolutionists have provided for these kinds of fossils.

A much better explanation for the existence of these animal remains, Thomas asseted, would be the young-earth Creation model. According to this belief, based upon the Scriptures, most dinosaur fossils were buried during the Great Flood around 4,400 years ago.

Nevertheless, despite what he sees as mounting evidence, Thomas pointed out that evolutionists still dogmatically claim that these animal remains are millions of years old.

Thomas is also the author of an article entitled “Genetics Analysis of Jews Confirms Genesis”, which neatly bring us round to the fact that Orthodox Jews are finding the teaching of evolutionary science in British schools “problematic”.

According to this report, Government plans to place greater emphasis on evolution in biology classes as part of its proposals to reform GCSE content have been criticised for “causing problems” for strictly Orthodox Jewish faith schools.

Under the new proposals students would be required to describe how evolution occurs; evaluate the evidence for evolution to include fossils; describe the work of Darwin and Wallace in the development of evolution theory; and explain the impact of evolution on modern biology.

Speaking to the Jewish Chronicle, Michael Cohen, an adviser to Orthodox schools, said:

I don’t see Charedi [ultra-Orthodox] schools going along with it. It is something that flies in face of their ethos and culture. It is clear this kind of proposal is definitely going to create difficulties for Charedi schools.

According to the Jewish Chronicle, modern Orthodox schools feel able to reconcile evolution with Jewish teachings on creation but Charedi schools regard it as opposed to traditional doctrine. There is currently just one Charedi Jewish school in the state sector.

Rabbi Avraham Pinter, principal of the state funded Chasidic girls’ secondary school, Yesodey Hatorah, told the Jewish Chronicle that he expected Charedi concerns to be raised in consultations about the reforms.

We are confident that the government will take into consideration the educational priorities of parents and children of all faiths, and ensure that this topic is covered in a balanced and sensitive manner.

The National Secular Society believes the proposals could be problematic for other “faith schools” within the state system. Stephen Evans, campaigns manager of the National Secular Society, said:

The danger with faith schools is that religion can so often become a big part of the educational provision. Many faith schools make a point of ensuring that the ‘religious ethos’ permeates through all lessons – including science.

When scientific facts are incompatible with the faith of the school, too often it will be the children’s education that is compromised, rather than the faith of the school.

Parents do have a right to educate their children in accordance with their religious convictions, but the inclusion of faith schools in our state education system results in the state becoming complicit in the inculcation of children with religious beliefs – something the state should play no part in.

Last year the Department for Education announced plans to make evolution a compulsory part of the primary school curriculum. The National Association of Jewish Orthodox Schools has since lobbied the department for a rethink.

Hat tip: BarrieJohn (Jewish schools report)