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Demented creationist creates a scene at the unveiling of an atheist monument in Florida

YESTERDAY saw the unveiling in Florida of America’s first atheist monument – and shortly after Young Earth creationist Eric Hovind climbed onto the granite slab and shouted his thanks to the atheists for giving him a platform to declare Jesus is real.

Eric Hovind

Eric Hovind

According to Rational Wiki, Hovind, 35:

Is the son of convicted tax-dodger and creationist wingnut Kent Hovind. Since his father’s imprisonment, Eric has taken over the running of his ministries. Despite having a slightly less annoying voice he’s every bit as insane.

The monument was placed in front of the Bradford County courthouse, next to one the lists the Ten Commandments. It was funded by American Atheists, who launched a lawsuit to have  the Ten Commandments slab removed from the courthouse lawn in this rural, conservative north Florida town best known for the prison that confines death row inmates.

The Community Men’s Fellowship erected the monument in what’s described as a free speech zone. During mediation on the case, the atheist group was told it could have its own monument, so it went ahead and commissioned one.

Said David Silverman, President of American Atheists:

When you look at this monument, the first thing you will notice is that it has a function. Atheists are about the real and the physical, so we selected to place this monument in the form of a bench.

It also serves another function — a counter to the religious monument. It bears quotes from Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, John Adams and Madalyn Murray O’Hair, the founder of American Atheists. Furthermore, it has a list of Old Testament punishments for violating the Ten Commandments, including death and stoning.

David Silverman, of American Atheists

David Silverman, of American Atheists

About 200 people attended the unveiling. Most were supportive, though there were protesters, including a group from Florida League of the South that had signs that said “Yankees Go Home”. Said Michael Tubbs, state chairman of the Florida League of the South.

We reject outsiders coming to Florida — especially from outside what we refer to as the Bible Belt — and trying to remake us in their own image. We do feel like it’s a stick in the eye to the Christian people of Florida to have these outsiders come down here with their money and their leadership and promote their outside values here.

According to this blog, during his speech Silverman announced that, though an anonymous donor, there will be 50 atheist monuments placed throughout the United States.

sacred-rain-arrowAnd while on the subject of monuments, we learned today that the Methodist minister who objected to having an image of the Oklahoma sacred rain arrow statue on his car’s licence plate was publicly branded today as “pathetic” and “ignorant” by Jura Nanuk, founder & President of Central-European Religious Freedom Institute.

In an open letter to pastor Keith Cressman of St. Mark’s United Methodist Church in Bethany, Oklahoma, Nanuk wrote:

I sincerely hope the God whom you preach will open your eyes and enable you to see absurdity of your claim. I am appalled by your lack of accord for cultural heritage of indigenous American population and I sincerely believe suing the state of Oklahoma for an innocent Native American symbol on its license plate is below pathetic.

I don’t know if you are aware that the very name of the state in which you live and preach is derived from the Choctaw words okla and humma, meaning ‘red people’. Do you plan to request changing the name of Oklahoma because it violates your own religious beliefs by reminding you of ‘pagan’ religion?

I find it necessary to remind you of the fact that the land you live on was taken away from those okla humma people and that having Native Indian symbol on your state’s license plate is a symbolic way to show them due respect. After taking their land away from them and forcing them to live in reservations don’t you see that having their symbol on license plate is symbolic way of saying ‘sorry’?Why do  you see it as a problem?

Did it ever occur to you that instead of pretending to be a victim due to your hurt feelings you might show some compassion for people who were taken to the brink of extinction by your ancestors?

I sincerely hope your God will forgive you your ignorance and lack of compassion.

Hat tip: Pete H & Trevor Blake

30 Responses to “Demented creationist creates a scene at the unveiling of an atheist monument in Florida”

  1. the Woggler says:

    Hospitals rather than churches? Good deeds are better than prayers? Life rather than death? An end to war, poverty and sickness? What sort of twisted mind carves these sick ideas into stone? Buttering up God’s ego. Warning against fancying your neighbour’s donkey. These are the things that we should be warning people about. These atheists are nothing but evil madmen.

  2. jay says:

    When my wife first told me about this monument I was astonished (as was she) that there were references the 10 commandment punishments. I can’t understand why that is there. Here we get a chance to make a statement and this sort of seems like sniping at a particular religious belief system.

    A monument is different from a website or a book. There analysis and critiquing are very important… something as a permanent statement, however, should be addressing what we’re about, not what we’re not.

    On the other subject, I must say that the response of Nanuk is of course the typical blendie interfaith crap that masquerades as open-mindedness. Religious symbology, whether a picture of Jesus, or of someone else, have NO business on license plates.

  3. Reginald Selkirk says:

    And while on the subject of monuments, we learned today that the Methodist minister who objected to having an image of the Oklahoma sacred rain arrow statue on his car’s licence plate was publicly branded today as “pathetic” and “ignorant” by Jura Nanuk, founder & President of Central-European Religious Freedom Institute.

    Be careful which side you take on that one. If his lawsuit is successful, it could be turned around and used against the use of Christian imagery on license plates and government property. I.e. it may be an “own goal.”

  4. remigius says:

    Is the son of convicted tax-dodger…

    If only I earned enough to be in a position to dodge taxes.

    I must be doing something wrong.

  5. Canada Dave says:

    Notice how the religious refer to the ten statements they say their god has carved in stone as …..”commandments”.

    Then read the atheists sentences carved in the stone….these are “ideas” and “thoughts” about just how the world could or should be.
    Atheists do not need to be bullied or cajoled into doing good or the right thing…..but the religious do.

    What kind of person needs to be told what is good or evil?
    ….a religious one…..they are but children living the life of 5 centuries ago….but living it in modern times….they seem unable to wipe the mud of more than 20 centuries of Judeo Christian dogma from their shoes.

  6. It’s interesting to note that the quote on the monument from John Adams is unfinished. Here is the quote with its proper contextual conclusion:

    “It will never be pretended that any persons employed in that service had interviews with the gods, or were in any degree under the inspiration of Heaven … it can no longer be called in question, whether authority in magistrates and obedience of citizens can be grounded on reason, morality, and the Christian religion.”

    As for the Treaty of Tripoli, the phrase quoted was not an actual part of the treaty. It wasn’t even written by an American and was never legally binding on our nation. I document the source of this phrase in my book “Hidden Facts of the Founding Era,” and the chapter on the Treaty of Tripoli is available for free at this link: http://christian76.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/The-Treaty-of-Tripoli.pdf

  7. AgentCormac says:

    “Did it ever occur to you that instead of pretending to be a victim due to your hurt feelings you might show some compassion for people who were taken to the brink of extinction by your ancestors?”

    Amazing. Hasn’t, right there, Jura Nanuk nailed the problem? These idiots don’t give a flying f**k about anyone else or their beliefs. All they care about is themselves and their own pathetic superstitions. They claim that their religion is all about love and compassion, but put it to the test and the opposite always turns out to be the case. They are some of the most stupid, intolerant and uneducated hate-mongers on the planet. However, I take great heart from the fact that, as this story implies, I honestly believe their horrible religion is dying on its feet.

  8. Canada Dave says:

    PS

    Tomorrow is Canada Day here.

    And the scribes and schills will be front and centre with the conservative Stephen Harper extolling the virtues that exist in our fair land.

    They will tell how a ‘god” has blessed us and brought forth the bounty of this huge landscape ….one half of North America.

    But they will not tell you of the religious schools created to convert the heathen native warriors who fought with us and the British to defend this land from Americans.
    These schools stole children from native parents thought unfit to raise young ones in a modern society.

    They will not tell you of the countless broken and burned irreplaceable native artefacts thought too be heathen…..and had to be destroyed so as not to corrupt their simple minds.

    They will also not dwell on the paedophilia rampant throughout the early days of settlement here …that continues today…with guidelines from Rome.

    I am a very proud Canadian….but not too proud that some of those that came before me had any part in the destruction of
    so called “heathen” native culture…..it was only heathen because it was not Christianity.

  9. Matt+Westwood says:

    @Canada Dave: Right on, brother.

    My own ancestors stole the land where I live from the natives some thousand years ago, and us descendants own it today still. There aren’t many true-blood celts, picts, gaels or even anglo-saxons now, they all ended up interbreeding with us Normans.

    Mind, having said that, there is talk of putting Boudicca (the very first “Queen Victoria” of at least some of the Britons) on one of our banknotes.

  10. Daz says:

    I sincerely hope the God whom you preach will open your eyes and enable you to see absurdity of your claim.

    I spy a problem with the expressed hope. If we have to wait for his god to do summat about it, methinks the chap is fated to remain a bigoted clod.

  11. remigius says:

    Mind, having said that, there is talk of putting Boudicca (the very first “Queen Victoria” of at least some of the Britons) on one of our banknotes.

    Yeah! Fuckin’ Romans.

    Fuck off back to Romania. And take your fucking aquaduct with you!

  12. Daz says:

    I’ve never seen a fucking aqueduct. Presumably cos they’re shy, and wander off into the bushes to do it.

  13. Daz says:

    Erm, I’m not sure what an aqueduct is, either.

    We needs edit functions!

  14. remigius says:

    I’ve never seen a fucking aqueduct. Presumably cos they’re shy, and wander off into the bushes to do it.

    Daz, you’re thinking of aquatic ducks.

    They can fuck of as well!

  15. remigius says:

    They can fuck off as well.

    Barry. Cunt wee git a nedit ting. Police.

  16. Jon says:

    “An atheist believes that….”? Believes? Who wrote this? Surely the word “thinks” would be far more appropriate here?

    An atheist thinks that a hospital should be built instead of a church.
    An atheist thinks that a deed must be done instead of a prayer said.

    No wonder we get accused that atheism is just another religion, that atheism is just another belief system and therefore no better and probably worse than theism.

  17. Daz says:

    Eider known that if I’d stopped to think…

    I’ll get me coat.

  18. Marven says:

    funny how atheists attack Christians, and its OK. And how muslims are left alone. Yet the muslim faith demands they treat all NON-BORN muslims as non-citizens, and equal to pigs, to be lied to, cheated, enslaved, or killed without impunity.

  19. 1859 says:

    I’m no duck! I’m just swanning off to lunch…

  20. Matt+Westwood says:

    Wot’s wong wiv you lot? You on quack or sommat?

  21. Alan says:

    @Matt+Westwood
    The Picts were probably invaders from north-west Europe who displaced the Celtic population.
    The Gaels were a subset of the Celts.
    The Angles and Saxons were invaders who displaced the Celtic population.
    And to be really confusing the people we call Celts, the people who first occupied Hibernia and Albion after the last age, weren’t Celts at all, they were originally from Portugal.

    And the Scots invaded northern Albion from Hibernia
    And the Irish are mainly Viking

    So who are the original natives?

    And it was similar in North America. There were at least two colonisations via the Bering Straits, and quite a few ‘native’ North American tribes had displaced a previous ‘native’ tribe.

  22. Angela_K says:

    Marven, look back at previous topics and you’ll find we attack ALL religions and mumbo-jumbo.

  23. oliver_cfc says:

    @Marven – it’s because there is a monument to the 10 Commandments there too. If there was a monument promoting Sharia law then I’m sure it would have been mentioned

  24. Zomberina says:

    @Dave F.

    I agree, it would be nice if quotes were used in context and not cherry picked like the religious tend to do. EVEN WITH THEIR OWN 10 COMMANDMENTS> seeing how there are wayyyyy more than 10, and are not what they purport to be the 10. Tit for tat.

  25. Marky Mark says:

    (And it was similar in North America. There were at least two colonisations via the Bering Straits, and quite a few ‘native’ North American tribes had displaced a previous ‘native’ tribe.)

    …And where does it end, should we all go back to Eurasia and the Fertile Crescent standing shoulder to shoulder?
    Races evolve, settle new areas and always have.
    Our Hispanic population in the US is growing by leaps and bounds, that are a combination of Spanish and the native, Central American tribes…here by the Bering Straits. They will mate with the European Caucasians, Afro Americans and create a new race…so what?
    It has been happening for years and years.
    We are talking about tribes and their ancient beliefs evolving to a new race with newer beliefs…these religious folks are just trying to preserve their traditions, not able to change.
    Their problem is the denial of science and the evolution of man/woman…easy to do when one thinks the planet is only 6-9000 years old.

  26. CatBallou says:

    Ahh, Marven. Another Christian “victim” of those mean atheists. You know perfectly well that Christianity, not Islam, is the predominant religion in the United States, and thus the rational target of pushback. Your whining is completely disingenuous.

  27. Matt+Westwood says:

    … and in 100 years time, 99% of the population of the British Isles will be of mid-east-asian ethnic origin, and Britain will be a theocracy.

  28. Mike De Fleuriot says:

    Excellent remigius

    Yeah! Fuckin’ Romans.

    Fuck off back to Romania. And take your fucking aquaduct with you!

  29. Oregon Jeff says:

    @Bill Fortenberry:

    “It’s interesting to note that the quote on the monument from John Adams is unfinished. Here is the quote with its proper contextual conclusion:

    “It will never be pretended that any persons employed in that service had interviews with the gods, or were in any degree under the inspiration of Heaven … it can no longer be called in question, whether authority in magistrates and obedience of citizens can be grounded on reason, morality, and the Christian religion.””

    Your idea of “proper contextual conclusion” is to reference another sentence that is a full 372 words later in the same paragraph while ignoring words that actually complete the sentence? Here’s the sentence, in full, so everyone can get the *actual* context and not your manufactured context:

    “It will never be pretended that any persons employed in that service had any interviews with the gods, or were in any degree under the inspiration of heaven, any more than those at work upon ships or houses, or labouring in merchandize or agriculture: it will for ever be acknowledged that these governments were contrived merely by the use of reason and the senses.”

    In fact, taking the entire sentence that you used to manufacture your own context, it can be understood even better when reading that sentence in its entirety.

    “The experiment is made, and has completely succeeded: it can no longer be called in question, whether authority in magistrates, and obedience of citizens, can be grounded on reason, morality, and the Christian religion, without the monkery of priests, or the knavery of politicians.”

    He’s saying, you can’t have something grounded on reason and morality and Christianity without priests and politicians using that against the people. In other words, he’s not saying anything that your cherry-picking of his words is saying.

    “As for the Treaty of Tripoli, the phrase quoted was not an actual part of the treaty.”

    So?

    “It wasn’t even written by an American and was never legally binding on our nation.”

    Again, so?

    “I document the source of this phrase in my book “Hidden Facts of the Founding Era,” and the chapter on the Treaty of Tripoli is available for free at this link: http://christian76.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/The-Treaty-of-Tripoli.pdf

    The source of the phrase isn’t relevant. Whether it was or was not in the Arabic version is irrelevant. It might matter for the enforcement of the treaty, but that’s it. However, what’s particularly important is that it was a part of the language of the treaty that the Senate unanimously ratified and the President signed. It indicates the sentiment of the leaders of the nation regarding Christianity at the time and the lack of involvement that religion (specifically Christianity) should play (none).