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Muslim jailed for killing ‘demonic’ wife

Muslim jailed for killing ‘demonic’ wife

AHMED Al-Khatib, 34, who subjected his wife to years of mental and physical abuse because he believed she had become “too Westernised” in the UK, has been jailed for a minimum of 20 years.

Mother of three, Rania Alayed, 25, gave up wearing traditional dress and made friends with fellow male when she enrolled at a local college and began studying English.

After suffering years of abuse, the Syrian-born woman was forced to flee the family home in January last year and seek sanctuary at a homeless refuge in a bid to start a new life.

But five months later Al-Khatib lured her to a flat in Salford, Greater Manchester, where he murdered her, stripped her of her clothes and concealed her body in a suitcase. It is believed the children were in the next room when the attack happened.

With the help of his two brothers he attempted to transport her remains to a remote forest close to her former home in the North East of England.

But as he sought to cover up his crimes his camper van developed mechanical trouble and he was forced to make a “split-second decision” and bury her by the side of the busy A19 near Thirsk, North Yorkshire.

Despite extensive searches of the area by police her body has never been found.

Al-Khatib, who met his wife when she was aged 15, reported her as missing a month after she was killed. His older brother Muhaned Al-Khatib, 39, confessed his part in the plot after watching a televised appeal for her safe return.

He was found not guilty of murder but jailed for three years at Manchester Crown Court after admitting perverting the course of justice. A third brother Hussain Al-Khateeb, 35, was convicted of the same crime and sentenced to four years in jail.

Ahmed Al-Khatib claimed that his wife was transformed into a Jinn – a Muslim spirit or demon – and that he pushed her to the ground resulting in her suffering a fatal head injury.

Hat tip: Angela K

39 responses to “Muslim jailed for killing ‘demonic’ wife”

  1. Agent Cormac says:

    Scum. Simple as.

  2. Broga says:

    Just looked at his photo. If ever “swivel eyed ” was appropriate this is it. What that poor woman must have suffered. Sickening.

  3. chrsbol says:

    So the brothers got 3 and 4 years for helping dispose of the body?
    Doesn’t seem quite enough somehow.

  4. bear47 says:

    In the photo, something about his eyes, maybe he just has that “look”, religious asshat look to him.
    And he did this crime in the name of his wonderful “religion of peace”. At the risk of sounding like a broken record, here I go again, organized religion is THE absolute worst human invention ever. I hope this clown never gets out of prison, maybe he can meet some “nice guy” while doing his prison time. Just what sort of punishment for crimes like this or child molesters would be appropriate? Wish I had an answer to that.
    Sick bastards and this bullshit about “honor” killing. What a goddamn crock of shit. What sort of “honor” can there be in killing a defenseless woman?

  5. Broga says:

    A minimum of 20 years is a start. I suppose he will have to be allowed to pray 5 times a day and be given Quoran reading time. Isn’t it time that Gove started introducing lessons in the use of reason, the need to examine facts and the way to identify fantasie?. Instead he encourages the opposite with faith schools and picks our pockets to fund these.

  6. Bubba T Flubba says:

    Another marvelous example of muslim manhood. Now who’s to blame? The fuckwit himself…..or the verminous imams who preach koranic evil …..or the law in this country that grants approval to clerics to incite, inculcate and indoctrinate criminal ideas into the stupefied minds of halfwit gullible numbskulls. If I was to set myself up and preach to the guys in my village that it’s ok to murder your wife if she gets ideas above her station I would expect to be given a good kicking by the locals, get arrested by the police and possibly sectioned into a mental hospital for being dangerously unhinged. So why are the incubators of terrorism, murder and hatred allowed to carry on. Time to wake up to the very real and dangerous islamic threat.

  7. Bubba T Flubba says:

    Too westernised??? What is this??? Just in case the nasty bastard fuckwit has not noticed he is living in the fucking west. If the west is so fuck shit bloody awful then why was he here in the first place. Typical of the hoards of bleating screeching shrieking islamic gutter snipes. They take advantage and enjoy this countries tolerance, handouts, freedoms, healthcare, facilities…..then slag it off as a degenerate kuffar nation. Well I say integrate or fuck off and live I some flea bitten disease ridden islamic sandpit failed state. Why do these vermin inflict themselves on us if they don’t like what we stand for?

  8. barriejohn says:

    Here’s another case, reported by ITV News this evening, though this bears yesterday’s date:

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-27719802

  9. Agent Cormac says:

    Religion – it’s all about peace and love, you know.
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-27732780

  10. Typical religious stupidity and fanaticism. All religious are mindless superstition. Islam is just the worst of them as it has grown up the least since medieval times.

  11. barriejohn says:

    I think you’ve put it in a nutshell.

  12. Newspaniard says:

    Of course, when he is released in say, 5 or 10 years, he will get a nice house, anonymity and buckets full of state aid. No hint will be made of deportation, poor misguided soul will get a pension for life from MY taxes. Ho Hum.

  13. Broga says:

    And he will also have his religious needs met in prison. In other words accommodating the same religious fiction that caused him to behave so abominably and put him in the slammer in the first place. It is time to toughen up on religion but that will never happen as long as it demands respect and gets it entirely on the basis that the belief is religious.

  14. Angela_K says:

    Yes, it is his “human right” to be indulged in his religion whilst incarcerated, the human rights of his victim are secondary.

  15. Broga says:

    OT: Am I guilty of moral cowardice? I met my local Christian this morning walking her dog. She is an elderly woman, known for her “good works” in the area. These include visits to the lonely and sometimes disabled. She told me she had prayed for me at her regular prayer group (they meet at each others houses) and they had all joined in. Bloody hell! I’ve been prayed for.
    I wondered about taking the piss as in, “That’s why I have felt so much better recently” or “I’ve had a message from God so I knew you had done this.” But I couldn’t. I just could not throw back at her what she thought was benefitting me. I muttered a few pleasantries and sidled off. This is by way of catharsis. I should probably be drummed out of the NSS.

  16. barriejohn says:

    Spawn of Satan; I shall never read any of your comments again!

  17. barriejohn says:

    OT as well, but this makes a pleasant change from all the “I saw a bright light in hospital so that proves beyond doubt that God really exists” nonsense that so often fills the Daily Mai these days:

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2651004/He-cook-play-music-use-computer-make-sarcastic-jokes-chatting-3-000-word-vocabulary-My-lunch-worlds-cleverest-chimp.html

    When I was young even the non-religious assured us that there were basic differences between humans and other animals that meant that they could not really use tools or language. Nice to see that Kanzi employs sarcasm – I bet he’s not religious then!

  18. Broga says:

    I knew it. Some things are just a step too far. Breaking news on the same subject my local Christian told me, during the same discussion, that she had heard on the radio that the Archbish, Justin Welby, had been praying for Nigeria and the abducted girls. She had been losing sleep over the girls but felt “much relieved” at JW’s intercession with God. So that’s OK.

  19. barriejohn says:

    As you know, I don’t think much of “Positive Thinking” as it can (like religion) be a very dangerous thing, but this made me laugh:

    http://tremendouslifebooks.wordpress.com/2012/05/30/please-stop-praying-for-me-i-need-all-the-problems-i-can-get/

    He does have a point. The more you analyze religious belief the more ridiculous it all becomes.

  20. Club Secretary says:

    I used to get this “praying for you” nonsense when I worked with some god bothers, usually in response to me commenting on my arthritis being particularly painful at the time.

    My usual retort was that they could be on more use mowing my lawn.

  21. Broga says:

    I find particularly puzzling the rush to prayer for people, including children, who have died. Why praise and thank a God who allowed this to happen? Would it not be more appropriate to condemn him? Particularly stomach churning is the, “God needed another angel so he sent for XX”. Or sometimes God wants another star in the sky. The fact that stars are vast nuclear furnaces doesn’t quite fit with it being little whatsit.

  22. Paul Cook says:

    I have a sneaking suspicion that what this demon did was out of rage and jealousy and lack of tolerance of a woman changing that he could not control any longer – more than his religion – although I have little doubt his religious and cultural upbringing did little to help control his rage and anger and clear brooding hatred for her over his impotence of control. And I do wonder if his subsequent use of islam and jinns and all that puerile nonsense was to lessen his sentence and or to somehow justify his dispicable action.

    it is no more or no less monstrous a crime than those committed by others who are so insanely jealous of wives, girlfriends, lovers, etc. and murder in such circumstances but without referring to a religion or lslam.

  23. Angela_K says:

    Broga, I have a standard retort to the “I’ll pray for you” nonsense which is “It will make you feel good but do nothing for me”

    I’m also reminded of an incident over thirty years ago when my then partner and I were trapped up to our necks in freezing sea water [the sea wall broke and flooded our basement Flat in a few seconds] The BBC TV man who interviewed us after we escaped asked if we had prayed, my partner replied that such a futile gesture was pointless – that bit of the interview was cut out.

  24. Broga says:

    Angela_K: About six years ago my wife and I had to be rescued by Helicopter after 9 cold hours against the base of a cliff when we got into trouble at sea in our kayaks. It never occurred to either of us to pray. I suppose if Christians in similar circumstances had prayed they would given the credit to God. We gave it to the terrific crew on the helicopter.

  25. Broga says:

    OT but too good to miss. I heard some flippant remarks about some World Cup teams seeking the help of Voodoo practitioners. The comments were delivered from what was clearly regarded as a sophisticated European perspective. Later I heard a trailer on The Sunday programme that there was to be an item on “the role of the pastors in the World Cup.” I didn’t listen to the programme. None so blind as those who refuse to see, came to mind.

  26. barriejohn says:

    BBC News reported on the pagan African Candomble faith of Brazil this morning. Evidently it can be easily accommodated by Catholicism. Isn’t life grandy-dandy?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Candombl%C3%A9

  27. remigius says:

    …some World Cup teams seeking the help of Voodoo practitioners.

    England? No chants.

  28. Broga says:

    Candomble sounds quite lively and with a lot to offer. If I abandon the Flying Spagetti Monster I could be converted to this. I would love to read an explanation from Frankie on how he can “easily accommodate” these beliefs. For a start monotheism would take a hit. On the other hand it is no more incredible than Frankie’s beliefs.

    “Practitioners of Candomblé believe in one all powerful God called Oludumaré, who is served by lesser deities, which are called orishas.[1][a] Candomblé practitioners believe that every person has their own individual orisha which controls his or her destiny and acts as a protector.[1] Music and dance are important parts of Candomblé ceremonies, since the dances enable worshippers to become possessed by the orishas.[1]

    There is no concept of good or bad in Candomblé; each person is required to fulfil his or her destiny to the fullest, regardless of what that is.[1]”

  29. Broga says:

    Unless they get the Voodoo guys on board with their powerful juju medicine. Get some of these shamans in the dressing room or even on the pitch to strengthen that flaky back four and we might get a result. I assume the Italian team will opt for the priests. Could be a test of which God is the more powerful.

  30. Norman Paterson says:

    Like you, Broga, I cannot be snappy to someone in person like that. Whatever they did has done you no harm, and it was from the best of intentions. It is as effective – and as ineffective – as someone saying “gee that’s terrible” when you complain of arthritis or whatever. There’s no need to take the piss or be hurtful in response. Accept it in the spirit in which it is given, and move on.

  31. barriejohn says:

    This has been appearing all over the place recently, so you may have read it already. Some guy wants to found a new religion with Mark Zuckerberg as its god. Well, good luck to him, as it makes as much sense as (or mabe more sense than) any other religion out there:

    http://www.dailydot.com/lol/the-church-of-facebook/

  32. barriejohn says:

    The sooner they go out the better as far as I’m concerned!

  33. remigius says:

    Faithbook?

  34. Broga says:

    If I were being preached at by a member of the clergy or some confident Christian then it would be different. The gloves would be off and I would be happy to debate the issues. This elderly women, who walks her dog in woods near me, could never debate the issues. So I intend to let it be.

  35. Broga says:

    I don’t think you will have too long to wait. But I would like to know whether the team pastor will be held in any way accountable for not getting God on board.

  36. Graham Martin-Royle says:

    Barry, you could be in trouble, criticising islam.

    http://freethoughtblogs.com/butterfliesandwheels/2014/06/the-deportation-of-imran-firasat/

  37. andrewm031 says:

    Yes. I’d seen that. If you make rational criticisms of Islam, based on the Koran, and are threatened, it’s obviously your fault, not that of the fanatics who want to kill you. Silly us. How could this man be so intolerant?