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Oregon suicide woman ‘ignored God’

Oregon suicide woman ‘ignored God’

In an ideal world we should have absolute freedom to choose when and how to die in dignified manner if we have a compelling reason to do so.

Unfortunately, there are far too few places where euthanasia is legal. But Oregon is an an exception, and it was to this state that Brittany Maynard, a 29-year-old woman with incurable brain cancer, moved recently from California to take lethal drugs made available under a state law that allows terminally ill people to end their lives.

Maynard, according to this report, had been in the national spotlight for about a month in the US since publicising that she and her husband, Dan Diaz, had moved to Portland from northern California. She told journalists she planned to die on November 1, shortly after her husband’s birthday, but reserved the right to move the date forward or push it back.

Maynard told the Associated Press in an October 8 interview that her husband and other relatives accepted her decision.

I think in the beginning my family members wanted a miracle; they wanted a cure for my cance. When we all sat down and looked at the facts, there isn’t a single person that loves me that wishes me more pain and more suffering.

Sean Crowley, a spokesman for the advocacy group Compassion & Choices, said:

She died [on Saturday] as she intended – peacefully in her bedroom, in the arms of her loved ones.

Crowley added that Maynard:

Suffered increasingly frequent and longer seizures, severe head and neck pain, and stroke-like symptoms. As symptoms grew more severe, she chose to abbreviate the dying process by taking the aid-in-dying medication she had received months ago.

The issue of physician-assisted dying is not new, but Maynard’s youth and vitality before she became ill brought the discussion to a younger generation.

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Working with Compassion & Choices, Maynard used her story to speak out for the right of terminally ill people like herself to end their lives on their own terms.

Cue the anti-choice, inhumane religious brigade.

Janet Morana, Executive Director of the group Priests for Life declared:

We are saddened by the fact that this young woman gave up hope, and now our concern is for other people with terminal illnesses who may contemplate following her example. Our prayer is that these people will find the courage to live every day to the fullest until God calls them home. Brittany’s death was not a victory for a political cause. It was a tragedy, hastened by despair and aided by the culture of death invading our country.

Shortly before Maynard’s death, Joni Eareckson Tada, a disabled Christian writing for the Religious News Service, said:

The saddest part of the story for me, however, is not her prognosis, but her decision to end her life prematurely on Nov. 1 through physician-assisted suicide.

I understand she may be in great pain, and her treatment options are limited and have their own devastating side effects, but I believe Brittany is missing a critical factor in her formula for death: God. The journey Brittany – for that matter, all of us – will undertake on the other side of death is the most important venture on which we will ever embark. So it must not be disregarded or brushed aside without thinking twice about the God who alone has the right to decide when life should begin and end.

She added:

Unfortunately, three countries and five states have now determined that individuals can make these choices for themselves. This is what happens when God is removed: The moral consensus that has guided that society begins to unravel. People in this country have bought into the premise that one really is better off dead than disabled.

Most nauseating of all was this nonsensical threat of a hellish, godless, lifeless afterlife:

If I could spend a few moments with Brittany before she swallows that prescription she has already filled, I would tell her how I have felt the love of Jesus strengthen and comfort me through my own cancer, chronic pain and quadriplegia. I would tell her that the saddest thing of all would be for her to wake up on the other side of her tombstone only to face a grim, joyless existence not only without life, but without God.

Brittany may think her choice is a highly personal and private one, but it is not. Already, her decision has reignited hotly contested debates as to whether physician-assisted suicide should be expanded beyond the five states where it is legal. Proponents of Brittany’s decision are already using her story as a bully pulpit to advance their so-called death-with-dignity agendas.

Only Jesus was able to transform the landscape of life-after-death by conquering the grave and opening the path to eternal life. Three grams of phenobarbital will provide only a temporary reprieve and will only more quickly usher in an eternity separated from God, which would be ultimate and pointless suffering.

Life is the most irreplaceable and fundamental condition of the human experience, and I implore Brittany and others considering her example to take a long, hard look at the consequences of a decision that is so fatal, and worst of all, so final.

Hat tip: Trevor Blake

22 responses to “Oregon suicide woman ‘ignored God’”

  1. Stephen Mynett says:

    “Most nauseating of all was this nonsensical threat of a hellish, godless, lifeless afterlife:”

    Well said Barry. The religionists are totally selfish and can only rely on myth and their own warped views to argue against the right of us to end our own suffering.

    I have watched at close hand my best friend die of AIDS and know many others who have, a few were deeply religious but that did not save them. I also know many would have gladly ended their suffering if they had had the chance.

  2. Jay says:

    If their mythical ‘god’ had been paying attention then just maybe it would have taken notice of the suffering of a dear woman and rectified the situation. Humanity is compelled to take charge of its own well being and destiny. Projecting the notions and requirements of a personal god idea upon another human being is, in itself, quite inhumane.

  3. L.Long says:

    My mom suffered for a year dying of terminal cancer and unable to die easily or take GOOD drugs because of her religion. It was an awful way to go, and if it happens to me, I will be taking enough GOOD (and illegal drugs) to go happy!!!!

  4. 1859 says:

    What awful saccharine mush ! ‘wake up on the other side of the grave’…’opening the path to eternal life’…

    Those convinced of their religion cannot abide anything the could undermine their beliefs – they are totally closed, shut off from reality, and basically they couldn’t give a ten cents fuck about someone else’s crippling pain – after all isn’t the agony of brain cancer something god herself has planned and ordained? And you can’t, you shouldn’t argue with what the big gay guy in the sky has ordained!

  5. Dioniogi says:

    thanks for the recipe

  6. Robster says:

    So, there’s a mob of dodgy clergy called “Priests for Life”. This would suggest that there is also a bob of morbidly gross clerics called “Priests for Death” as there is can be no good without bad. These would be the same priests that happily serve up bits of dead jesus with his (ugh) blood every Sunday at the communion brunch in that weird catholic cannibalistic ritual with the priestly person doing an abracadabra magic trick with the wine and cracker and they consider it quite normal, even desirable. Those that indulge in such nonsense should be rounded up and locked away from the rest of us to maintain where possible a sense of normality.

  7. Paul Cook says:

    So there is a death cult(ure) in the USA?

    There is “the culture of death invading our country” according to Janet Morana, Executive Director of the group Priests for Life.

    Yes she is actually correct. But there is not just one. They are christainty, judaism and islam, all death cult religions. None of which savour the life there is in us as humans, just the death after this life.

  8. Graham Martin-Royle says:

    I have absolutely no objection to those that believe in deities prolonging their lives as long as they can, suffering as much pain, agony, torment as they wish so that they can die at a moment that they believe a creator deity has ordained for them. I have no wish to impose my lack of belief on them.

    I just wish that they would be polite enough to do the same to me and not impose their beliefs onto me. That’s why I’m going up to London on Friday to take part in the demo supporting the bill to bring in assisted death in the UK.

  9. Newspaniard says:

    Whatever you do, under whatever circumstances, there is always a bunch of people who feel that they are justified in ordering you about. We have the Health and Safety Nazis who wont allow the police or firemen to spontaneously do their jobs. There are the anti-smoking brigade, now melding into an anti-drinking one. The anti-abortionists which should never be allowed near real children. Then there are the politicians and legates who refuse to even consult on assisted suicide. And we all live in a “free” society. Ho Hum.

  10. Ex Patriot says:

    I offer my condolences to the family for their loss of a loved one. She made the right choice contrary to what the religious nut cases think or say.I am at an age when the time is growing less and less and as I live in Europe I will opt for the Netherlands or Switzerland if the need arises. If that cannot be I will obtain what I need one way or another. Screw religion and those that preach it to the ignorant.

  11. Gordon says:

    If you refuse to look you will not see! Jesus said “I am the Way, the Truth and the Life. No one comes to the Father except through me”.

  12. Barry Duke says:

    Simples, Ex Patriot. Let Nurse Betty show you how it’s done.
    http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=b7c_1359440522&comments=1
    Here an updated video
    http://youtu.be/RDUnFFo-gd4
    And here’s one showing a 91-year-old Californian woman making suicide kits.
    http://youtu.be/-yPgBNi0nGM

  13. barriejohn says:

    Graham Martin-Royle: What I object to is people who tell us that “God” is in control and has decided when we should die, and that we should not be “playing at god” by interfering in this process, then taking expensive drugs and using hospital services at public expense to artificially extend their own lives. I used to shake my head at elderly Christians who boasted about how many tablets they took every day, and told us how “grateful to the Lord” they were that their lives had been prolonged, whilst singing words like:

    “Till He come!”, Oh let the words
    Linger on the trembling chords;
    Let the “little while” between
    In their golden light be seen.
    Let us think how heaven and home
    Lie beyond that “Till He come!”.

    Poppycock; their natural instinct is to hold onto mortal life as long as possible, just like everyone else.

  14. jay says:

    I can think of few things more terrifying then being kept alive when there is no hope.

    Torture of the cruelest sort

  15. Broga says:

    It is turns the stomach that these interfering Christians, worshipping their fictional tyrant God, want to remove choice from those who do not agree with them. And we have 26 unelected bishops in the House of Lords (sign in to pick up £300 every time) who can influence legislation.

    I wonder how many of these creatures have never had the experience of enduring the prolongued, terminal and painful death of someone close to them?

  16. jay says:

    I don’t know about the UK, but here in the US, the religious are only part of the opposition. There is a deal of opposition from (essentially secular) disabled rights activists who claim that allowing chosen death ‘devalues’ the lives of their patients. Unfortunately, they are being just like the religious in determining to interfere with other peoples’ choices because they don’t approve of those choices.

  17. Har Davids says:

    As long as people can make up their own mind, leave the morons to die a painful and prolonged death as that is what their god or consience wants. An aunt of mine died assisted and we were all able to say our goodbyes one day before she took the plunge. A better memory than the one of my father who died very, very slowly.

  18. Stephen Mynett says:

    Jay, your post reminded me of a very obnoxious person I used to work with. She was always spouting on about disabled rights, although always used the term “differently abled”, which I hate as it is patronising. She had no disability and yet claimed to be able to speak for all disabled, yet she was rarely, if ever, interested in my thoughts on disability issues and I was the only disabled person in the office.

    There is also a problem in the UK where we have do-gooders/politically correct, albeit some well intentioned, that try to speak for people they do not understand or have any real empathy with. The simple fact is no one can speak for all disabled, not even the disabled as we are a very varied group.

  19. dennis says:

    Sorry to her family and her. I have lost two people I loved cut down early in life.
    We in the states have two problems
    1. religion
    2. Doctors with god complex and their profit motive to keep the charges being added to the bill.
    I hope the doctors will be kind enough to for-go their charges and let me die peaceably. I do not worry about religion because the people who love me will let me die with out such an invasion of my rights as a human.

  20. barriejohn says:

    Dennis: You’ve got another problem now – Republicans!

  21. John says:

    It is a tragic fact that this young woman has had to end her life.
    There must have been a huge amount of unrealised potential in her.
    When I see religionists spouting off their usual nonsense on occasions like this, I recall that no less a person than the Pope – literally infallible according to Church of Rome doctrine – awarded Jimmy Saville a knighthood.
    Yep – you can always rely on religionists to get things right – can’t you ??!!

  22. Jeffrey Jones says:

    But Jesus himself brought about his own death. He knew he was going to die at the hands of the Sanhedrin and the Romans, but refused to walk away from it.
    I am also given to understand that there are people out there who don’t believe that the crackers and wine actually become the body of Jesus when the priest gives it to them. Such people are doomed to eternal hell for such blasphemy and disbelief.