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Teacher called God to report bad behaviour

Teacher called God to report bad behaviour

Sheila Jones, above, head of St Joseph’s Roman Catholic Primary, Devizes, has sparked an investigation into her teaching methods after parents complained that  she made pupils lie on the floor while she ‘phoned God’  to report their bad behaviour.

Wiltshire Council, according to the BBC, is carrying out an investigation following complaints from parents to Ofsted and to governors at the academy school.
The Council has confirmed that its safeguarding team is investigating a number of complaints raised by parents.

The parents had claimed their children were quiet and distressed after the punishment in the school’s prayer room which is said to have involved pupils being forced to lie face down on the floor while the head told them she was going to phone God on her mobile phone to say they had been naughty.

Ofsted said in a letter to parents.

The information provided raised concerns about the safety of the children. Ofsted has shared your concerns with the local authority so they can progress these safeguarding concerns as they consider appropriate.”

The school’s website says the school aims to instil:

Timeless values in God’s ever-changing world, where every child will fulfil their potential.

In a welcome message on the website, Jones says she moved to the area 20 years ago, sent her four daughters to the school and was also a teacher and governor there before having “the very great privilege” of being head.

Governors at the academy school, which is outside local authority control, are directing inquiries on the matter to Wiltshire Council.

This report claims that parents are demanding Jones’ resignation.

Tammy Brimble said her son Cyrus, 11, was one of the children punished.

I don’t think what she did was appropriate at all. We are not Roman Catholics, but it was still distressing for my child.

Tammy says she made several attempts to speak to the head and has now written a letter of complaint to the school governors and Ofsted.

In a letter to governors, she said she had proof of:

The harm this has caused.

Another mum, Alexandra Jones, who used to work as a midday supervisor, has also complained to Ofsted.

A telephone call to heaven, according to Freethinker contributor Jack Hastie, would probably sound like this.

Hat tip: Denis Watkins & BarrieJohn

8 responses to “Teacher called God to report bad behaviour”

  1. Marky Mark says:

    Kinda like calling Santa to keep the little ones in line, only for the older kids…But why would the all powerful need a phone call, thought he could see everything??

  2. barriejohn says:

    I’m sure I posted this ages ago!

    https://youtu.be/D5dxahEOAcs

  3. Brian Jordan says:

    “I don’t think what she did was appropriate at all. We are not Roman Catholics, but it was still distressing for my child.”
    When I was little, “RC children” were shipped off to the RC school. Now in the interests of “diversity” non-RC children are shipped off to RC schools too. Or to Sikh schools and no doubt whatever other religious school has been required to keep 50% of its places open for reluctant infidel families to have their children shipped into. Charming.

  4. Broga says:

    I’m not a fan of Ofsted following their efforts at assessing a grandchild’s nursery. This, from this incident, is typical Ofsted bureauspeak:

    “Ofsted said in a letter to parents.

    The information provided raised concerns about the safety of the children. Ofsted has shared your concerns with the local authority so they can progress these safeguarding concerns as they consider appropriate.”

    “Concerns” used three times; the information didn’t raise concerns, the parents did, “share” usually means do fuck all because they don’t know what to do and want to pass the buck; “progress” used as a verb, “safeguarding” is lazy writing and “consider appropriate” means we will leave it to someone else and thus absolve ourselves.

    Whoever inhabits the bureaucratic recesses of Ofsted seems unlikely to know how to assess the quality of education and care in a school. But maybe I have been unlucky in my limited experience of them.

  5. gegsieline says:

    I wonder how Ofsted rate the value of a prayer room to the children’s education.

  6. Broga says:

    @gegsieline: I wondered about the prayer room and how much time they spend praying in it. It is shocking that in 2015 children are still led to assume that some disembodied spirit is there listening to them. No evidence being offered for the existence of the spirit. I also wonder about what the school teaches regarding evolution and creationism.

    Meanwhile, scientists have charted, after 10 years work, the pathways amongst 100 galaxies. Light takes millions of years to travel amongst them and the Milky Way is an ordinary galaxy on the edge of them in this cosmic scheme. As we are God’s special creation, he seems to have wasted so much effort in creating the rest of it. No mention, of course, of galaxies in his all knowing, inerrant bible.

    Ofsted should be asking what the school means by this piece of verbal flatulence which it offers to parents:
    “Timeless values in God’s ever-changing world, where every child will fulfil their potential.”

  7. AgentCormac says:

    Isn’t what this head teacher has done pretty much par for the course for the rcc? Scaring innocent children shitless so they will be good, obedient little believers for life is hardly anything new. However, it seems to me that the positive to be taken from this article is that finally, finally, people are having the guts to speak out against such archaic indoctrination and will not let the church and its zealots have it all their own way any more.

  8. Brummie says:

    @AgentCormac.
    Interesting reading is the (Baltimore) Catechism which, as a child of 7 in an RCC school in the 1950s, we all had to learn by rote. It produced “Obedient Little Believers” by indoctrination paid for by the state.
    The Q & A therein is both hilarious and horrenous in its banning of free thought and an enquiring mind; e.g.
    Q. Who made you?
    A. God made me.
    Q. Why did god make you?
    A. God made me to love him and serve him in this world and forever in the next.

    Distribution of that same 1950s Catechism (now hard to acquire) would be such an effective weapon for defeating the evil influence of the catholic church.