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Judge told of an exorcism that ‘cleansed’ a killer of demons

Judge told of an exorcism that ‘cleansed’ a killer of demons

A South African judge, due to sentence Aljar Swartz, above, for murder, said this week that she would ‘take into account’ the fact that killer had been freed of demonic possession by a cleric who carried out an exorcism outside Pollsmoor Prison in Cape Town.

According to this report, Judge Elize Steyn, who is expected to sentence Swartz next week, heard that Methodist Reverend Cecil Begbie had “cleansed” the killer of his demons.

Begbie told the court:

There was a day when I engaged in special prayers for him, where I invited the congregation [in Rondevlei] to stand and to raise their hands towards Pollsmoor Prison and we all then united in prayer, not only for Aljar, but for all inmates of Pollsmoor Prison, including the staff as well.

Speaking during arguments in mitigation of sentence, he said he had met Swartz about five times and it was clear that he was “demon-possessed”.
Swartz was recently found guilty of the premeditated murder of 15-year-old Lee Adams, as well as three counts of incitement to commit murder.

He admitted to beheading the teenager in 2013 so he could sell the body parts to a sangoma (spiritual healer).

Pollsmoor Prison turned down Begbie’s application to perform the exorcism inside the building. Had it been allowed, Swartz’s defence would have filmed it.

Begbie, who had been a minister for almost 50 years, said he was left with no other option but to call upon congregations and the international community to pray for Swartz.

A radical change had then taken place in Swartz, he said.??Relatives of Adams, dressed in the teen’s favourite colour purple, shook their heads at the testimony.

Swartz apparently shared a “very special experience” with the reverend when he visited him in cells at the high court.

There was a moment about three weeks ago when he felt as though he was standing under a waterfall and pure clean water flowed through his whole body after that experience. He felt he was totally set free of all demons.

That means the almighty God, who is not restricted to walls of prisons or prison bars, actually administered to him supernaturally as a result of all prayers. I could also then sense that, yes, there was a radical change in Aljar.

Swartz was able to sleep properly for the first time in years. He experienced tremendous peace of heart and mind, Begbie said.

Prior to this experience, a spiritual counsellor at the prison had led Swartz “to accept Christ”.

Judge Steyn told Swartz’s lawyer, Sheriff Mohamed, that she was not going to allow him to lead evidence on:

Magic, witchcraft and all other things.? How many times in South African law has the court allowed ‘the devil made me do it?’ The court has never accepted it.

But she did say she would take his “cleansing” into account when passing sentence.

Hat tip: BarrieJohn

11 responses to “Judge told of an exorcism that ‘cleansed’ a killer of demons”

  1. L.Long says:

    BS!!! Demons aint real dimwit!!!

  2. Broga says:

    Begbie!!! Any relation to Begbie in “Trainspotting?” If so, then the judge needs to know.

    Demons? Looks as if we have not moved on over the last 2,000 years. There is little hope for the human condition. Supposedly civilised and intelligent politicians still plough money into faith schools. And tomorrow the BBC will smother us with religious, meaningless drivel.

  3. CoastalMaineBird says:

    Gee – I wonder why they weren’t allowed to film it ?

  4. CoastalMaineBird says:

    Sheriff Mohamed

    Somebody’s pulling my leg…

  5. tonye says:

    I took a moment to look outside
    my window this morning.

    The images I saw were from the
    21st century.

    Who would have guessed…..?

  6. Rob Andrews says:

    Maybe he was cured of demons. Or maybe he is just saying that he was, Could be that Mr. Swartz is fibbing a little.

    How do you know if he’s telling the truth?

    “People use religion like drunks use a lamp post, for support not illumination”–. from the web. I forgot where.

  7. Vanity Unfair says:

    [S]he would take his “cleansing” into account when passing sentence. That means giving it all the value it deserves. That might be ironic. I can hope.
    On the brighter side it seems that applied research into exorcism now means that the exorcist does not have to be in the company of the possessed person; holy water does not have to be sprinkled to bring out the unclean spirit: no bell nor book nor candle needs to be anywhere in the vicinity and the afflicted one does not even need to know when, or even whether, the ceremony is held. The waters of salvation will be self-evident. Hallelujah! A perfect, blinded experiment: who can now say that the Church is not scientific?
    On the other hand it might be a case of a cynical murderer taking advantage of a deluded cleric. Let’s consult Brother William of Ockham.

  8. Vanity Unfair says:

    To CoastalMaineBird:
    Homonyms, of course: I probably had the same vision that you had involving Lawrence of Arabia.
    However:
    Old English, Shire Reeve (King’s legal representative)-> Sheriff
    and:
    Arabic, Sharif (noble, high-born) -> Sheriff (depending on transliteration).
    It’s not so much fun, though.

  9. barriejohn says:

    Vanity Unfair: My cousin married a Marshall, and they had five children, so I always addressed Christmas cards to “The Marshalls and the Outlaws”, or something like that!

  10. andym says:

    The judge could be being canny here. “Taking into consideration” could mean she is thinking about increasing the sentence due to his failure to accept any responsibility. I hope so.

  11. How very primitive these South Africans are. The number of murders and rapes which occur there are completely out of control. 4000 farmers, for example, have been murdered since Saint Mandela came to power, often in the most appalling ways imaginable. Alas, the situation is certain to become much, much worse in future. I advise the non-indigenous population to leave while there is still time.