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Quebec old folks’ home gets a divine message … from a spud

Quebec old folks’ home gets a divine message … from a spud

Catholics are a superstitious bunch, constantly on the look-out for miracles and wondrous signs.

potato

Alain Lévesque and Émilien Morin

So it’s no surprise that the “devout Catholic residents” at Le Mieux Vivre Residence in Grande-Rivière became ecstatic when Alain Lévesque, a cook working at the home, informed them last month that he’d found a “divine” potato with a cross at its centre.

According to CBC News the potato is being hailed as a “sign of a divine presence in the building”.

Said Émilien Morin, President of the residents’ committee at the home:

He saw it was a cross and he said, ‘It’s a sign’. He couldn’t believe it.

The home is now working on a plan to preserve the potato.

Jeannette Moreau, a residents’ committee member, is currently housing the potato in her apartment as it dries.

Morin says the potato-drying process could take up to a month, adding that the spud has started to darken but the sign of the cross at its centre is still highly visible.

He doesn’t want people to visit the vegetable until it’s fully dried and ready to be displayed in a custom-made display case.

Morin added that the potato will be on display in the dining room where all residents can enjoy being near it, and that it will make them “feel safe”.

According to the Hamilton Spectator, Morin conceded that it’s not uncommon to find holes and shapes in the middle of spuds but he believes the cross is unusual.

I’m 80 years old, and it’s the first time I’ve seen anything like this.

He says the residents are hoping the potato is the bearer of a divine message, although Morin isn’t sure what that message might be.

Who knows? Maybe it will bring nothing. It’s only a potato.

18 responses to “Quebec old folks’ home gets a divine message … from a spud”

  1. sailor1031 says:

    can we see the back where the hole the wireworm came out is? Or was the worm still in there when Alain cut the potato in half? Did the chef murder a doGly worm?
    Emilien is right however, it is a sign – a sign of ignorant superstition that I thought was starting to be a thing of the past in Quebec.

  2. DMedd says:

    God’s idea of social media – he’s now a YouTuber.

  3. CoastalMaineBird says:

    IT’S A POTATO !

  4. Stephen Mynett says:

    It is easy to con the gullible, as they never grow up and can be amazed as easy, often easier, than children. As sailor said it was probably a worm, although it does make me think of a trick a favourite uncle used to play.
    My uncle Jim was in the Merchant Navy and, like most sailors, had long times at sea with not much to do, so whiled away the time in many ways, including learning odd tricks and skills. He was not home often but I remember one visit when he had brought us some “special” foreign bananas that came ready-sliced. He would produce what looked and felt like a normal banana but when you peeled it it was already neatly cut into about half-inch slices all the way. To a young boy it was amazing but it was actually quite simple, albeit very skilful. It was done with a needle and thread and the small needle holes were only visible if you knew to look for them.
    That trick still gives me very happy memories of a long gone and loved uncle but, unlike the religionists, he was a scientific man and enjoyed the science as much as as the fun of a trick and always eventually explained to us how he did things.
    It is a great shame that there are those that cannot accept skill or coincidence for what they are and have to add a supernatural meaning to things.
    The religionists, unlike my uncle, will never give their secrets away, it would be far too dangerous as people may start to question a couple of books thrown together by a mixture of misogynistic goat-herds and Roman power-seekers.

  5. Broga says:

    Could the potato miracle be a sign from Saint Tess?

  6. Stephen Mynett says:

    I don’t think so Broga, it did not have a Dollar sign as well as the cross.

  7. barriejohn says:

    Stephen Mynett: My father was an atheist, and amateur conjuror and entertainer (and very good too). We lived with my grandmother in an old Victorian house, and there was a large, black “range” in the living room (which he replaced with a “nice, modern fireplace”, believe it or not – one of those nondescript, tiled monstrosities). I remember as if it was yesterday one Christmas when I was about four years old, being told to write a little letter to Santa Claus with my requests for Christmas (as I had been a very good boy that year). I duly carried out this task and left the letter in its tiny children’s envelope on the top of the range. Imagine my delight a few moments later when said letter started to rise up in the air, and disappeared up the chimney, where Father Christmas, I was assured, was going to read it! Of course, Mum had attached it to some black cotton which had been fed down the chimney by my father, who was at the fireplace in the bedroom above pulling on the other end. When my old Christian friends ask me why I no longer “believe” I tell them that I no longer believe in Father Christmas either!

  8. Hooray ... CoE is going down. says:

    Oh dear … how pathetic.

    And the rcc has really undermined its credibility with the beatification of the evil money grabbing poverty loving gnome. She even admitted before she died that she did not actually believe … and her miracles have worldly explanations such as medical intervention. Christopher Hitchens demolished her reputation and exposed her nasty exploitation of the dying to promote her agenda.

  9. Paul says:

    So gawd in his infinite supremeness and In all the wonder he creates, moves and infinite wisdom, he/she/it has decided to put a sign – a cross – inside a potato.
    So he won’t make it rain so children can drink clean water. He created mosquitoes that kill millions but won’t make them sterile, or ticks, or worms.
    Rid us of viruses that kill too. Or cancers. Or help stop wars.
    Or resolve the way That animals eat each other alive. Insects that Lay their eggs inside other insects or animals that eat ther way out of the host, which is paralysed. Snakes that bite. Spiders sharks lions tigers. Hippos.
    He/she /it creates earthquakes Hurricanes, floods that cause Untold devastation and suffering. Lightening strikes that start fires. Tsunamis. Religions that murder in his it’s name. Burn people alive and behead people. Cause suffering for people by stating do not use a condom.
    Yet he has time to put a cross in a potato.

    These people need to be ridiculed for what they are infantile and puerile.

  10. AgentCormac says:

    As a species we have achieved truly increible things. We have flown to our moon (come to think of it, the fact we are able to fly at all now seems everyday, but it’s actually extraordinary). We have eradicated diseases. Discovered how to use stem cells to fight against cancers and birth defects. Invented computers and the internet which makes it possible for me to talk to you and anyone else who might be interested right now. Mapped other worlds. I could go on, but you know what I’m saying – the list is almost endless. Yet it is still impossible to overestimate the stupidity of some human beings. In particular, those we must unfortunately share our world with whose brains have been turned to rotting compost by religion. I mean, a vegetable which just happens to have a cross shape in it and you think there’s some supernatural significance to this astonushing discovery? FFS. Unbelievable – just like your ludicrous faith, as it happens.

  11. Dave says:

    Well let’s face it, a cross is highly complex and the chances of finding occurring naturally must be astronomical. Therefore, it must be a sign from God.

  12. Paul says:

    Religion: The blind man that is the best guide through a dark forest at night. But a f*******g idiotic thing to rely on when day break rises.
    How I wish the religious could truly see the light and not be afraid of the dark, but they seem to want to be blind and guided through the day time by a blind idiot.

  13. Paul says:

    Dave
    Hope you’re being facetious.

    Look at the complexity and form that arises so naturally in the beautiful snowflake: every one of them is different yet so complex.

  14. 1859 says:

    Religious vegetables? God is sure having to scrape the proverbial barrel. I mean if He wants us to all believe He should just show us His tits and be done with it. Save all this palaver with spuds. Anyone remember the bun with the face of Saint Tess?
    Civilised, rational behaviour is a thin veneer covering almost 2 million years of sprites, pixies, devils and deities. For 99.9% of our existence we have believed in the most outrageous claptrap imaginable – so it doesn’t take long to tap in to this nonsense because it’s just below the surface, as this spud story beautifully illustrates.

  15. 1859 says:

    @ barriejohn: Something is puzzling me and I hope you will forgive my presumption in asking you a personal question but, if your Dad was an atheist how did you end up being so heavily involved with the Plymouth Brethren? But if you’d rather not say that’s entirely OK, I will understand.

    Your Dad sounds like a great guy – especially with the letter up the chimney. When my kids were small I tried to play Santa Claus and nearly broke my leg falling down the stairs. That shattered my kid’s belief in the supernatural – their dad screaming in agony at the foot of the stairs!

  16. sailor1031 says:

    If Alain had sliced the potato crosswise instead of lengthwise we would never have had this miraculous demonstration of the awesome power of doG. Definitely its ways are mysterious.

  17. Peter Sykes says:

    How do they which way up the spud is to be looked at? Could it be an inverted cross, a sign of the devil…

  18. barriejohn says:

    @1859: My father was, indeed, a great guy, and not at all happy about my involvement with the Plymouth Brethren. However, he had a colleague who was a devout member, and who, with his family, was a close friend of ours, and who tried for years to get me involved. When we all moved to Swindon due to their work, my Chemistry teacher was a member of the local assembly, and I was ensnared due to their wives calling on my mother one afternoon and innocently asking whether my sister and I “would like to join the local Sunday School”! I wish my father had taken a stricter line, and limited my attendance until I was older and wiser (which he did think he ought have done), but it’s too late now.

    PS My boyhood friend had two much older brothers, and assured me early on that Father Christmas was really your parents, and I argued vociferously with him about it, as my dad said differently. One Christmas Day I woke in the early hours, hearing a noise at my bedroom door, and opened it to find my parents standing there very sheepishly, holding my stocking and presents. Quick as a flash my dad said, “Father Christmas knew that you were awake and left your presents outside your door”, but the cat was well and truly out of the bag!