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Atheists in Kenya denied access to a children’s home

Atheists in Kenya denied access to a children’s home

Atheists in Kenya (AIK), led by Harrison Mumia, above, has suffered another setback.

After receiving official recognition, the group was left in limbo earlier this year when the Attorney General ordered the reversal of its registration because of pressure put on the government by religious zealots.

Now, according to this report, members have been banned from visiting a children’s home in Limuru to donate food, clothes and stationery.

Mumia, quite rightly, has accused the authorities of discrimination, and has written a letter of complaint to the Ministry of Public Service, Youth and Gender Affairs.

The letter to Cabinet Secretary Sicily Kariuki pointed out that the management of the NEST home had allowed the atheists to make the visit which was scheduled for today, November 26, but the department instructed the home to bar them.

Part of the letter stated:

We want to take issue with the Children’s Department in the country for what seems to be blatant discrimination against atheists in Kenya. Their decision to stop atheists from visiting the NEST Children’s Home reeks of religious extremism and is in a bad taste.

Director of the Home, Irene Baumgartner, confirmed that she received a call from the department asking her to bar the group from visiting the facility.

I am not the one who banned them. I received a call from the Children’s office in Kiambu and was directed not to allow them because they have a court case.

According to this May, 2016, report, on February 17,  2016, Atheists in Kenya (AIK) received their registration certificate from the Registrar of Societies. The group became the first atheist society to gain registration in Kenya. The Deputy Registrar of Societies registered the group as a society under Section 10 of the Societies Act.

Before that, the Registrar of Societies had denied AIK registration, saying that the move could affect the “peace and good order” in the country. The group’s leader threatened to go to court and the Registrar’s office withdrew the earlier decision, thereby granting AIK registration status in the process.

However, in what appears to be outright intimidation from religious “characters”, the Attorney General has written to the Registrar of Societies directing the office to withdraw the registration of AIK. This comes after a group of religious leaders demanded that the Attorney General resigns for issuing the directive to have AIK registered.

An alliance of these Christian and Muslim leaders said that they would go to court and mobilise their followers into the streets if the Registrar of Societies failed to deregister the group. Nevertheless, in a statement, AIK said that they had not received written notice concerning deregistration and pledged to go on with their activities.

Hat tip: BarrieJohn

7 responses to “Atheists in Kenya denied access to a children’s home”

  1. L.Long says:

    And so many people want a theocracy NOT controlled by law but by fictional writings. And yet thru out the world and history we see societies that no one but a select few would want to live in! Religion does poison everything. I have yet to see a society based on any religion I would like to live in!

  2. remigius says:

    “…to donate food, clothes and stationery.”

    No wonder they were banned. They should follow the example of the church and offer the children lies, bigotry and a sore arse.

  3. Trevor Blake says:

    Religion: that which denies food and clothing to children in Kenya. They must feel proud. A slow clap around the world for the faithful of Kenya.

  4. Graham Martin-Royle says:

    They are more willing to let the children suffer than to admit to the existence of atheists (we know THEY exist which is more than can be said for their invisible magic friends).

  5. 1859 says:

    Well of course, receiving food and clothes from atheists might make the children THINK! And how fucking dreadful that would be! That there are real-world people who do not believe in a god AND who are prepared to donate food and clothes – holy crap whatever next! The children might start to THINK that atheists are moral, good-hearted people, who can live quite contentedly without superstition.

  6. Kevin says:

    Keep up the good work Harrison…. “so that their eyes may see and their ears may hear”… the good news!

  7. barriejohn says:

    Here’s some really bad news from Kenya:

    The Alpha course has been a huge success in driving evangelism in the UK and elsewhere in the world, but a recent initiative has seen the Holy Trinity Brompton-based course’s reach massively increased – in Kenya.

    It’s all down to a partnership with child sponsorship charity Compassion International.

    Since Compassion Kenya began using Alpha as a tool to help with the spiritual formation of the children in their projects, more than 28,000 young Kenyans have taken part in the course. It’s because Compassion is committed not just to feeding, clothing and educating children living in poverty, but to helping them grow into capable, confident adults. Spiritual development is part of that growth, and that’s where Alpha comes in. It’s used primarily as a discussion tool and is one of the many courses on offer for children at their local Compassion projects.

    Compassion works through local churches and believes they provide the best platform for long-lasting, relational development, though it’s keen to stress that it’s not only interested in seeing people become Christians; it wants to empower children to make choices for themselves. However, it’s also clear in its belief that the key to unlocking poverty – in all its forms, physical, social, economic and spiritual – comes from personally knowing God.

    http://www.christiantoday.com/article/transforming.lives.how.alpha.has.reached.28000.young.people.with.the.gospel.in.kenya/101962.htm

    What a load of absolute bullshit. “Compassion” my arse!