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Governor’s ‘pray away crime’ idea disgusts Kentucky pastor

Governor’s ‘pray away crime’ idea disgusts Kentucky pastor

Reverent Clay Calloway, above right, of the West Louisville Ministers Coalition, said he wanted to ‘throw up’ when Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin, left, this week unveiled a plan to fight crime with prayer in the city of Louisville.

Bevin, according to this report, suggested at a community meeting on Thursday that volunteer groups of between three and ten people would adopt specific blocks and walk around them while praying.Volunteer patrols that will not report or stop criminal activity, but

You know, you walk to a corner, pray for the people, talk to people along the way. No songs, no singing, no bullhorn, no T-shirts, no chanting. Be pleasant, talk to the people, that’s it.

Bevin said the “prayer police” would make year-long commitments, and even suggested specific zip codes for the roving bands of Christian crime-busters to patrol.

Calloway was so disgusted by the Republican Governor’s comments that he walked out of the meeting.

The only thing I wish was present was a barf bag in front of my seat so I could throw up. Otherwise, I might have stayed a little bit longer.

“Prayer WILL change things,” Bevin wrote on Twitter. “Prayer is powerful, and a people united in prayer will make a difference in their communities,” he wrote in another tweet.

The meeting was held amid growing violence in Louisville.

Reverent Joe Phelps of the Highland Baptist Church said:

I believe in prayer. I’m a pastor. I pray every day, I pray all the time.

But:

That’s not the answer here. I feel embarrassed for the Christian faith if the Governor of Kentucky is saying these things as a solution to violence in our community.

Oliver Evans of Spradling Memorial AME Zion Church told local NBC station WAVE that although he had mixed feelings, overall he supported the prayer plan.

As a matter of fact, I will share this with my congregation when we meet on Sunday.

MeShorn T Daniels, above , of God’s Lives Matter, was also encouraged by the plan.

It’s a seed, like with anything. If you don’t do anything you don’t get nothing. But if you apply something, and the prayer is a seed, you look to see what happens from that so that’s why I support the idea.

Rashaad Abdur-Rahman, head of the city’s Office of Safe and Healthy Neighborhoods, said that Bevin had “oversimplified” the issue.

It’s unfortunate that he doesn’t know what’s been going on in the city … He’s not really in touch.

9 responses to “Governor’s ‘pray away crime’ idea disgusts Kentucky pastor”

  1. CoastalMaineBird says:

    But if you apply something, and the prayer is a seed, you look to see what happens from that

    Somebody show me something, ANYTHING, that prayer has accomplished.

    Sure, you prayed to pass the math test, and you passed the math test – don’t you think the ones who flunked prayed just as hard as you?

    So, go ahead and “look to see what happens”.

  2. sailor1031 says:

    If this cockamamie plan is executed I predict a rise in the number of assaults in public in Louisville KY. Since when do the religious simply “talk to people”? At or down maybe but “to”?

  3. sailor1031 says:

    Was it only black pastors to whom this plan was pitched? and black parts of town?

  4. Bart says:

    CoastalMaineBird
    “Somebody show me something, ANYTHING, that prayer has accomplished”.

    It has achieved so much for centuries … for some factions / individuals. Here are just two examples:-
    1) Convincing people that there is a god who listens to prayers for salvation and deliverance from evil has conned hundreds of millions of stupefied people to accept a harsh life on earth as a mere prelude to a life in paradise in the hereafter whilst the pious clerics have reaped the temporal earthly rewards of power, wealth and comfort.
    2) The islamofacists who ache for the global dominion of a caliphate convinced an abject looser to pray to god for safe delivery to paradise and a life of hedonistic debauched martyrdom in return for converting themselves and innocent bystanders leaving a pop concert in Manchester into an exploding sower of severed flying limbs, offal and gore.

    See … prayer does work … for the cunning evil conmen who have grand ambitions and designs in the here and now.

  5. Stuart H. says:

    Hopefully it will be as short lived as the time faith-heads round my way organised a pilot ‘street pastor’ scheme to accompany the police around the time the weekend clubs & pubs were chucking out. The police never released official figures, but I know from talking to a few that it actually led to more disturbances, as folk going happily enough home got accosted by bible-wielding do-gooders.

    Actually it was worse than that because most of the street pastors were knocking on a bit. The scheme finally ended after one night when a police van had to take time out to drive two of them home ill, which meant there was no cover when a fight kicked off and no way of transporting drunks to the cells to sleep it off.

  6. barriejohn says:

    Perhaps they could “pray away” some illnesses instead, then we’d be really impressed:

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-40143165

  7. John the Drunkard says:

    The startling correlation between high rates of crime, drug use, venereal disease, illiteracy, poverty, single-parent households and….RELIGIOSITY is illustrated in every U.S. State.

    Let alone between the U.S. and every other developed nation on earth.

    So if prayer is the solution, why is the problem worse in every location that does more of it?

  8. Trevor Blake says:

    How will they know if their prayers succeeded? Or if they have not yet succeeded? Or did not succeed?

    “People say we need religion when what they really mean is we need police.” H. L. Mencken

  9. Robster says:

    Translation: “You can look after yourselves….”