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Buddhists’ religious ceremony caused environmental damage

Buddhists’ religious ceremony caused environmental damage

Two Buddhists who who released foreign crustaceans into the sea at the UK resort of Brighton as part of a religious ceremony have been fined almost £15,000 for causing ‘untold damage’ to the environment.

According to this Guardian report, Londoners Zhixiong Li, an estate agent, and Ni Li, a City banker – both pictured above – released £5,000 worth of crabs and lobsters into the Channel back in 2015.

The pair were part of a group of almost 1,000 people celebrating the visit of the Taiwanese Buddhist master Hai Tao, who hosted the 1st Asian Buddhist Animal Rights Conference in Seoul, South Korea, last year.

Their ritual was performed in the belief that returning animals to the wild is good karma. But because the crustaceans were not native species, they threatened other marine life and government agencies had to spend thousands of pounds in an attempt to recapture the shellfish, offering fishermen a bounty to reel them in.

In the first case of its kind, Zhixiong Li, 30, and Ni Li, 33, admitted wildlife offences and were fined at Brighton magistrates’ court this week after pleading guilty to releasing non-native species into the wild.

Joseph Miller, prosecuting for the Marine Management Organisation, said the case first came to light after a Brighton fisherman captured some of the foreign shellfish in June 2015.

CCTV footage from Brighton marina showed the group of Buddhists chartering three boats, having also bought more than £2,500 worth of native crabs and lobsters from Brighton and Newhaven Fish Sales at Shoreham harbour.

Miller said Zhixiong Li had bought the local shellfish and hired the boat. Further investigations found that 361 American lobsters and 350 Dungeness (US) crabs had been bought from a wholesale fish supplier, SeeWoo, in Greenwich, south-east London, by Ni Li.

Miller said:

Ni Li said they had been intended to be released as part of a Buddhist ceremony with no intention to harm them.

Zhixiong had asked her to buy as many as possible. Miss Li followed the delivery to Brighton. Miss Li then lied to investigators saying she hadn’t realised the crabs and lobsters were foreign species and had taken them back home and kept them in a bath of saltwater. She later admitted she had made up the story.

Only 323 crustaceans have been recovered and the most recent American lobsters found had been carrying “viable eggs”, showing they had been breeding.

District judge William Ashworth said:

The release of non-active species into the marine environment is regulated precisely because the potential impact on native fish stocks could be significant.

Unfortunately, not all these specimens have been recovered and the last few demonstrated that the lobsters are capable of breeding and producing viable offspring, The full impact of what you did is not known.

Ni Li was fined £5,300 and Zhixiong Li £500. They were also ordered to pay £9,000 compensation.

This is not the first time Hai Tao’s followers have got into trouble for their attempts to save animals. In 2012, followers released 100kg of cobras in a mountainous area not native to the snakes.

23 responses to “Buddhists’ religious ceremony caused environmental damage”

  1. L.Long says:

    Religion is not only a solid source of evil, but stoopid as well.

  2. barriejohn says:

    L.Long: This was doubly “stoopid”. By buying the animals from a supplier they were actually SUPPORTING and ENCOURAGING the trade. Doh! Do idiots like these actually think about what they are doing?

  3. 1859 says:

    ‘ In 2012, followers released 100kg of cobras in a mountainous area not native to the snakes.’

    Is this the way Buddhists take over the world? ‘Good karma’???
    What woolly crap is this ‘karma’ anyhow? I’m sure the cobras are as much in the dark as I am. I think I will make up something that no-one has ever heard of and explain it in a language no-one also has never heard of – and then I’ll translate it. Here goes …. ‘Tukki fuckki Salpapa gogo nid fip e nid fip’. Roughly translated this means ‘There is an essence called ‘Salpapa’ that connects with all other essences to spread goodness into everyone’s vital functions and health.’ Voila! A new religion is born!

  4. Broga says:

    “The road to hell is paved with good intentions.”

  5. barriejohn says:

    @1859: Why bother making up anything? You can just join the millions of others who are already fleecing the gullible with ready-made idiotic nonsense.

    http://www.reiki.org/faq/WhatIsReiki.html

    Take a look at the Questions and Answers:

    Reiki energy is a subtle energy. It is different than electricity or chemical energy or other kinds of physical energy. Reiki energy comes from the Higher Power, which exists on a higher dimension than the physical world we are familiar with. When viewed clairvoyantly, Reiki energy appears to come down from above and to enter the top of the practitioners head after which if flows through the body and out the hands. It appears to flow this way because of our perspective. However, the true source of Reiki energy is within ourselves. This does not mean that we use our personal energy when we do Reiki, but that the energy is coming from a transcendental part of ourselves that is connected to an infinite supply of healing energy.

    You couldn’t improve on that!

  6. Johan says:

    Better get onto that Reiki energy stuff fucking quick and develop a 500 Terra Watt power station to suck it all in an distribute it. I mean it could solve the energy crisis and dependence on dangerous CO2 liberating fossil fuels and save the planet from runaway greenhouse global warming. And I bet that Reiki energy is that stuff cosmologists call dark energy. Come on. We need more Buddhist scientists. What are we waiting for.

  7. Johan says:

    I’m an animal … and I’m suffering … suffering everyday because of loons like this. Please stop my suffering and fuck off you morons.

  8. Broga says:

    Reiki. Comes from a “higher power” and enters through the top of the head. How do they keep getting away with spouting this nonsense? I think there are “Reiki practitioners” who take money for using Reiki. It is a great racket. None of the problems of years spent on degrees and professional qualifications.

  9. 1859 says:

    ‘We hew out an image from our fear and call it god’ – Ingmar Bergman.

  10. Broga says:

    1859: Great quote. Many of the Christians I meet seem to me to have a fear of death. They certainly have no wish to reach their longed for heaven.

  11. Tee says:

    They fear death, and therefore they look to religion in the desperate hope for life after death, but they are not totally convinced, they have a gnawing fear, and are therefore terrified of the prospect of the whole thing being untrue. A mixture of cowardice and stupidity.

  12. Broga says:

    Tee: You sum it up well. As an atheist I prefer Epicurus attitude: “I do not fear death because when death is here I am not; when I am here death is not.”

    It seems to me that a fear of death is entirely natural to atheist and believer alike. What the atheist has a good chance of escaping is the terror that, as you say, gnaws at the believer. The terror of the eternal flames has long been a potent means of controlling behaviour and extracting money for the Roman Catholic Church.

  13. Peter Sykes says:

    Broga:
    “The road to hell is paved with good samaritans.” – straightdope.com

  14. AgentCormac says:

    ‘Our existence is but a brief crack of light between two eternities of darkness’, as Vladimir Nabokov once rather depressingly put it.

  15. barriejohn says:

    @andym: That’s brilliant! When I was at college, a piece of paper was circulating bearing three lists of words (two adjectives and the last nouns), from each of which one could be chosen at random to create a three-word, meaningless phrase that aped the terminology of psychology and sociology; for example:

    “Dynamic, reinterpretative intuition.”

    I wish I had kept a copy!

  16. Broga says:

    William Faulkner said that no one who read a Hemingway book would need to reach for a dictionary. But even a dictionary would not help you get through the turgid swamps of New Age bullshit. I like Hemingway’s style of writing – particularly the short stories.

  17. barriejohn says:

    Broga: The following clip is an absolute classic. I had a friend who spoke the same way; he always “purchased the comestibles”, rather than did the shopping!

    https://youtu.be/hOSYiT2iG08

  18. Broga says:

    barriejohn: thanks. I had a friend who was hooked on adjectives – a view was always gorgeous, an experience was always incredible. His life long ambition was to get a letter published in The Times. He showed me some and they were packed with adjectives. He thought that meant the way to write well. He never got published.

  19. DOM says:

    Markets throughout Thailand contain dozens of different types of animals in small cages standing in the hot sun just waiting for someone to buy one and release it into the wild, what another great religion the world has.

  20. StephenJP says:

    What baffles me is that these two vandals are an estate agent and a city banker. In other words, for much of their daily lives they make at least some use of reason, logic and common sense (although considering some of the bankers and estate agents I have known, that statement may need some modification). Yet they still believe in this supernatural Buddhist bollocks,and seem to be completely incurious about the wider implications. I thought Buddhists were supposed to care about the welfare of all living things? Oh, unless they’re Burmese Muslims, of course.

  21. Peter Sykes says:

    barriejohn you need this:
    http://sebpearce.com/bullshit/

  22. barriejohn says:

    Peter Sykes: It must be Ground Hog Day. I was replying to someone who had posted that link higher up the thread!

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