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Thieves and fraudsters rob US churches of billions of dollars

Thieves and fraudsters rob US churches of billions of dollars

Certified public accountant Lisa London, above, said in a press release issued this week that churches in America need to protect their coffers far better than they do at present.

Why? Because apparently thieves and fraudsters find it as easy to do to churches what churches do to their congregations: fleece the bejesus out of them.

Brotherhood Mutual, an insurance company specialising in serving religious institutions, says that over $39 billion was stolen from churches in 2014, surpassing the $35 billion churches spent on missionary work in the same period. And the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners revealed that nonprofits lose an average of 5-7 percent of their revenues each year to fraud and theft.

London, author of the globally recognised guide Using QuickBooks Online for Small Nonprofits and Churches, says the thieves are usually the people you would least suspect.

Their crimes require motives, means, and opportunity.

Not much can be done about motives, London notes, but churches and nonprofits can do something about limiting the means and opportunities that may be present for the more than 62 million people who volunteer each year for their churches, local PTAs, Little Leagues, homeowner associations, and civic groups who may be asked to handle money for the organisation or a fundraiser.

Dishonesty among the godly?

Good grief, next we’ll be told that kiddies aren’t safe in the presence of priests.

13 responses to “Thieves and fraudsters rob US churches of billions of dollars”

  1. CoastalMaineBird says:

    the thieves are usually the people you would least suspect.

    The thieves are atheists? I see no evidence of that !

  2. Broga says:

    Where there is religion, corruption surely follows.

  3. Banners says:

    … over $39 billion was stolen from churches in 2014, surpassing the $35 billion churches spent on missionary work in the same period.
    Well what’s wrong with that? Better the money is not wasted upon missionary work in my view.
    Eskimo. “Will I go to hell if I don’t believe in your God?”
    Missionary. “Yes”
    Eskimo. “Then why did you tell me about him?”

    Native African. “Before the missionaries came we had the land and they had the bibles. Now we have the bibles and they have all the land.”

    And what do you expect from a bunch of hucksters taking money from stupefied halfwits? Honesty? No, it’s a foregone conclusion that con artists will con each other.

  4. Robster says:

    What a laugh! Professional fraudsters being professionally defrauded. I can see a film here.

  5. andym says:

    I’m just reading a posthumous collection of Ruth Rendell short stories. A recurring theme is how miscreants are tripped up by their own naivety. They never expect anyone else to be as devious as they are….

  6. Banners says:

    Can anyone willing to be so dishonest as to claim knowledge of the will of god, any god, be trusted with even a penny?

  7. Banners says:

    Or trusted with anything.

  8. Banners says:

    The 800 year old church in my village is now illuminated by night with a very fancy recently installed floodlight system. And of course this has running costs as well as capital outlay. You can see the damned place from far and wide now
    which of course is the motive for the project. When I asked the vicar why spend so fecklessly when you are begging for parishioner money to preserve the fabric of the building. “Oh it is for security to deter thieves”. When asked why can’t god protect against crime when apparently he can transport souls to eternal paradise there was no plausible explanation other than several minutes of shameless unintelligible religiobabble. And the vicar told me not to be so wantonly ignorant in asking such silly a question in the first place.

  9. Jobrag says:

    Number eight, number eight, number eight.

  10. Vanity Unfair says:

    If anybody is caught, only the second fraudster will be prosecuted.

  11. Smokey says:

    If I could steal from Christianity (or any religion, really), I would do it. Shamelessly. And even proudly.

    Because whatever I spent the money on, booze or whores or whatever, it would impact the world less negatively. What’s better, for whores to earn their living wages, or for Christians to give bibles to starving African children?

    Screw the children. How you doin’?

  12. The website http://www.churchsecurity.info/ shows how priests and others are stealing from Church collections plates in Catholic Churches all over America. There is a book which is described as a groundbreaking work about the U.S. Catholic hierarchy’s knowing and willful failure to protect the Church’s primary source of income is now available at Lulu.com and Amazon.com as well as Barnes & Noble and other booksellers.

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