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Failed doomsday predictions turn people off Christianity

Failed doomsday predictions turn people off Christianity

Russell Moore, President of the Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention, has had enough of evangelists making end-of-the-world predictions.

According to this report, Moore last week argued that “any day could be Judgment Day,” but at the same time, warned that such doomsday predictions:

Have little to do with religion and everything to do with marketing.

What is more, he cautioned:

Sometimes people reject the good news of Christianity while never knowing that what they are turning aside isn’t, in fact, anything that Jesus or those he sent said at all..

He was reacting to the latest failed doomsday prediction that said the world would end on September 23.

Moore, a “liberal” who caused deep divisions among Baptists for, among other things, his anti-Trump views, also had a pop at various Christian TV evangelists and talk-show hosts who promote a “frantic” message that the world is ending soon – without specifying a date.

Usually proponents will just note how interesting it is that Bible prophecies about signs in the heavens and earthquakes just happen to sound like earthquakes and hurricanes and solar eclipses in the news right now.

Many of them will then have books for sale about how to discern these times, and some even have for sale, conveniently enough, freeze-dried packets of lima beans one can purchase for one’s post-Armageddon bomb shelter.

Moore insisted that this is not new and is far from biblical Christianity.

Jesus, and then his apostles, told us to expect a day of final judgment, to look for the return of Christ to our present reality of space and time. But the key to all of this is the unexpected nature of it. Jesus said that life would go on, just as it always does, until, suddenly  – like a thief in the night – the eastern skies explode into light …

One thing is for sure. When that day does arrive, we will not need numerology to figure out if it’s here. Jesus will be visible and indisputable. And he will not be selling anything.

21 responses to “Failed doomsday predictions turn people off Christianity”

  1. L.Long says:

    “…Sometimes people reject the good news of Christianity while never knowing that what they are turning aside isn’t, in fact, anything that Jesus or those he sent said at all…..”
    And what is the ‘good news’????
    And don’t even think of ‘love your neighbor’ BS!

  2. AgentCormac says:

    In other words, ‘These whakos are making life difficult for those of us who are only borderline bonkers’.

    And according to presenters of Radio 4’s Today programme, the show’s odious ‘Thought For The Day’ slot is so boring and irrelevant it’s turning people off too.
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/10/30/john-humphrys-thought-day-deeply-deeply-boring/

  3. andym says:

    “Sometimes people reject the good news of Christianity while never knowing that what they are turning aside isn’t, in fact, anything that Jesus or those he sent said at all..”

    You’re right. But not in the way that you think you are.

  4. barriejohn says:

    All he’s saying is: “Me and my bunch of Christians are right, and all the others are wrong”, which is what the world has been hearing for nearly two thousand years now.

  5. Broga says:

    AgentCormac: I stopped listening to TFTD months ago. But who is it who is able to force this junk on a licence paying audience when even the presenters think it is repetitive drivel?

    The defence of the programme comes from the egregious Anne (my husband is a vicar) Armstrong and some bishop bleating the meaningless “people see the world through the lens of religion that is provided by TFTD.”

  6. Stephen Mynett says:

    I have lost count the number of times the world was supposed to end, even in my fairly short lifetime. I find it tragic that people still believe these religionists.

    I realise the indoctrination processes are thorough but often I think it is that too many people are just scared of thinking.

  7. lucy1 says:

    “people see the world through the lens of religion that is provided by TFTD.”

    A lens dropped onto gravel, stamped on for a week, covered in mud and then scratched with a pin.

  8. Broga says:

    andym: “You’re right. But not in the way that you think you are.”

    Who is right? And in what way have they got what wrong?

  9. andym says:

    He’s right in that a lot of people reject Christianity without realising just how mythical its basis is. But I don’t think that was what he meant.

  10. Stephen Mynett says:

    Broga, the last time I heard TFTD was when bored in a hotel room at an airport, my flight had been cancelled the night before and I was waiting to be notified when my next flight would be – that was more fun than the radio drivel.

    Some ponce was rambling on about the power of prayer and faith healing, almost to the point of telling people to ignore real medicine. I immediately emailed the BBC to complain about this, especially as his message was bloody dangerous. They did not have the decency to reply, apart from an automated “we got your message.”

  11. Vanity Unfair says:

    Jesus said that life would go on, just as it always does, until, suddenly – like a thief in the night – the eastern skies explode into light.

    I had forgotten this. Matthew 24:27 AV
    “For as the lightning cometh out of the east, and shineth even unto the west; so shall also the coming of the Son of man be.”
    The only way everybody could see something in the East would be if the Earth were flat. On a globe it is impossible. The Bible is inerrant. Therefore the Earth is flat. I claim my Nobel Prize for Physics.

  12. Vanity Unfair says:

    And lightning does not always originate in the East, even in the Levant.

  13. Cali Ron says:

    Stephen Mynett: “…I think it is that too many people are just scared of thinking.” I think it’s intellectual laziness. Why think for yourself and figure things out when there are always plenty of people happy to tell you what anything means and what to think about it. I work with a man whose actually pretty smart, but rarely ever uses his intelligence because he’s extremely lazy. Too lazy to bother to think things out. Same with the religious, why bother to read the bible and try to understand it when the church tells what it says and means.

  14. Italian Scallion says:

    The Bible? Please, the Bible is nothing more than a bunch of idiotic stories written by shepherds when they weren’t boffing sheep. As for prayer fixing anything. You have a better chance of having tea with the Queen.

  15. 1859 says:

    But the world will definitely end. Astrophysicists have calculated that when the Sun’s nuclear fuels reach some critical value it will begin to expand and gobble up the five inner planets to become a red dwarf. This is set to happen on Tuesday afternoon at about 3:16 pm roughly 50 million years from now give or take 10 million years. So I’m off to the supermarket to stock up!

  16. Broga says:

    1859″ But the human species, so beloved by God, is going to self destruct much earlier. More than 75% of insects have gone over the last 50 years and they are essential to our survival. And while the earth is already choked by the most destructive of pests the RC Church, and other deluded outfits, insist on breeding more.

    Meanwhile the manic Trump and the man child Kimmy have their fingers itching to press the nuclear button.

  17. barriejohn says:

    Broga: I think the game’s up. Politicians all over are playing the “Make Our Nation Great Again” fiddle while the rest of us can burn in hell.

    Concentrations of CO2 in the Earth’s atmosphere surged to a record high in 2016, according to the World Meteorological Organization (WMO).

    Last year’s increase was 50% higher than the average of the past 10 years.

    Researchers say a combination of human activities and the El Niño weather phenomenon drove CO2 to a level not seen in 800,000 years.

    Scientists say this risks making global temperature targets largely unattainable.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-41778089

  18. Broga says:

    barriejohn: I fear the game is over and I wish I could draw a different conclusion. I have two young grandchildren, whose company is always a delight, and I look at them and wonder at the world we are producing for them and so many others.

  19. Broga says:

    PS: Meanwhile the mass circulation newspapers devote more attention to Harry Windsor and his girl friend than to the catastrophe you aptly describe.

  20. barriejohn says:

    Broga: Maybe your grandchildren would like to go snorkelling in some tropical paradise one day!

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/plastic-rubbish-tide-caribbean-island-roatan-honduras-coast-pollution-a8017381.html

  21. Broga says:

    barriejohn: Bloody hell. That is shocking. But really who, in a position of power, appears to care any more? And so much of the media and its audience are concerned with what a football team with a local name but made up of foreign millionaires is doing. And, of course, the celeb worship is in full flow. I have moved into the carpe diem mode.

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