News

Police compel Indian ‘miracle worker’ to bury his dead son

Police compel Indian ‘miracle worker’ to bury his dead son

When his 17-year-old son died late last month from cancer, ‘Bishop’ Octavio Nevis, above, held onto the body, believing that the teen would be ‘resurrected’ through the power of prayer.

But after police intervened, Nevis, founder of the Jesus for All Nations Ministry (JFAN) church, agreed this week to bury the body of Meshach Octavio – 12 days after the teenager’s death.

Followers of the ‘bishop’ are now playing the ‘persecuted Christians’ card, saying that the police had no right to intervene.

One devotee is quoted in this report as saying:

If our beliefs don’t trouble anyone, why should there be a problem? Why can’t you see larger issues, instead of targeting someone’s beliefs? We were sure Meshach would walk with us, but you people ruined it — now he will go to heaven. Brother Octavio had earlier brought Meshach back to life twice, when his doctors had lost faith and had declared him dead.

An officer from Nagpada police station said:

The followers, along with their apostle Nevis, were praying and believed Meshach would start walking with them again.

More than 200 people gathered for Meshach’s funeral and were seen praying for over two hours to try and bring him back to life.

Another follower said:

Octavio is a middleman between God and us. We have complete faith in him. People from all around the world come to him for their diseases and have been cured by him.

A spokesperson for Maharashtra Andhashraddha Nirmoolan Samiti, an organisation established by assassinated doctor and rationalist Narendra Dabholkar, said:

The police have promised us action under the Maharashtra Prevention and Eradication of Human Sacrifice and Other Inhuman, Evil and Aghori Practices and Black Magic Act 2013. It involves a fine up to 50,000 rupees and imprisonment for up to seven years.

Advocate Trupti Patil added:

The police had initially told us, ‘Let them carry out the burial first’. Now we know it has happened, we expect an FIR to be registered. We will now approach Nagpada police and ask them to register an offence.

12 responses to “Police compel Indian ‘miracle worker’ to bury his dead son”

  1. CoastalMaineBird says:

    you people ruined it — now he will go to heaven.

    Oops.

  2. L.Long says:

    I agree you should keep his body as long as necessary to resurrect him!! Please do! After some time the foul bacteria will be strong enough to infect and may be even kill you all off as well!

  3. Johan says:

    Primitive beyond comprehension.

  4. Angela_K says:

    Nevis god let his son die of cancer and is now going to resurrect his son? Wouldn’t it have been better if this god hadn’t let the son die of cancer in the first place?

  5. John the Drunkard says:

    Only REPUBLICAN’S ‘thoughts and prayers’ count…right?

  6. barriejohn says:

    I cannot think of a single instance in all my years as a Christian when a so-called “answered prayer” was anything other than a “happy coincidence”. One of the most dramatic was at the boys’ camp one year when all over the western part of Great Britain storms flooded camp sites and tore down tents, forcing holidaymakers to return home, but our camp (thanks in no small measure to the efforts of the officers) continued. The boys were given a solemn lecture about this in the morning, but I remember thinking to myself: “Our tents survived because they were pitched in a steep valley which was sheltered from the worst of the winds”! I do, however, remember dramatic examples of occasions when prayer went conspicuously UNanswered, as in the case of the lovely little daughter of Christians who was struck down with a brain tumour. Again, I wasn’t greatly impressed by claims that her survival for some years was evidence that all those hours of corporate prayer had had their due effect, and again, why would God cause her all that suffering, and put her parents through so much anguish, just to show that he could “heal” her? The ultimate get-out on such occasions is “Nevertheless, not my will but thine be done”, which seems to render all prayer absolutely pointless, if the all-knowing, all-powerful Creator, who has predestined everything that is to happen in the universe, is going to do what he wants anyway.

  7. andym says:

    I can remember from school assembly a teacher quoting from somewhere,”when people start to pray, coincidences start to happen,” as if showing the power of prayer. My reaction was then as it is now, ” ‘course they bloody do! It’s called statistics.”

  8. ray metcalfe says:

    If you pray for something and get it then god answered your prayer if you didn’t then it wasn’t in his plan simple.
    You cant go wrong with logic like that.

  9. barriejohn says:

    Ray: Exactly!

  10. AgentCormac says:

    How incredibly sad. This man, who has had to endure the anguish of losing his son, has somehow been convinced that prayer would bring that son back to life. The false hope which the superstition of religion always offers is as shameful as it is immoral. And the vulnerable and the gullible are, as ever, the victims. Personally, pity is the only thing I feel for Octavio Nevis.

  11. gedediah says:

    This man knows his ‘healings’ are fake, so to exploit his son’s death like that is just horrible.

  12. Stan says:

    The Christians still ain’t in no hurry to get to heaven

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *